ABOUT ME


Profile

Yuki Koizumi

Assistant Professor
Information Sharing Platform Laboratory,
Graduate School of Information Science and Technology,
Osaka University

Biography

Yuki Koizumi skipped the fourth grades of the Undergraduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University to enter the Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, in 2004. He received his Master of Information Science and Ph.D. of Information Science degrees from Osaka University, Japan, in 2006 and 2009, respectively. Since 2009, he has been an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Japan.

RESEARCH TOPICS


Information Centric Networking (ICN)

Modeling Energy Consumption of an ICN router

Information Centric Networking (ICN) has been gotten much attention due to its built-in functionalities such as caching and mobility-support. One of important research challenges is to reduce power consumed by ICN networks because ICN's packet forwarding and packet-level caching are energy-hungry. As the first step of achieving power-efficient ICN networks, we develop a power consumption model of a multicore software ICN router while taking into account power consumed by energy-hungry computation. The main contributions of this research are three-fold: First, the model is one of the first realistic models which consider ICN packet forwarding and packet-level caching. Second, the model is represented as concise equations with just a few parameters. Third, we apply the model to estimate power consumed by simple networks in order to answer a question which would not be answered without this model.

Related Papers

[1] Toru Hasegawa, Yuto Nakai, Kaito Ohsugi, Junji Takemasa, Yuki Koizumi, and Ioannis Psaras, “Empirically Modeling How a Multicore Software ICN Router and an ICN Network Consume Power,” in Proceedings of ACM Conference on Information-Centric Networking (ICN 2014), Sept. 2014.

Energy Efficient ICN-based Message Delivery for Cellular Networks

In this research, we propose an ICN-based message delivery protocol over a cellular network in disasters. Collaborative communication among cellular devices is integrated into the protocol so that power consumed by battery-operated BSs (Base Stations) is reduced when a breakout occurs. A key idea is to reduce consumed radio resources by making cellular devices of which radio propagation quality is better forward messages of neighboring devices. The radio resource reduction contributes to reducing power consumed by a battery-operated BS.

Related Papers

[1] Suhwuk Kim, Yuki Urata, Yuki Koizumi, and Toru Hasegawa, "Power-saving NDN-based Message Delivery based on Collaborative Communication in Disasters," in Proceedings of IEEE International Workshop on Local and Metropolitan Area Networks (LANMAN 2015), Apr. 2015.

Cellular Networks

Routing-based Mobility Management Architecture for IoT Devices

How the mobile Internet accommodates a huge number of IoT devices is an important research challenge since their number grows to several billions. An important observation about IoT device communications is that IoT devices have different characteristics in mobility from traditional mobile devices such as cellular phones. Strict mobility management scheme and session mobility provided by handover functions are not required for the IoT device mobility management. In this research, we focus on IoT communication features, and propose a routing-based mobility architecture for them. Our routing architecture uses the Bloom Filter as a data structure to store routing information. We clarify the effectiveness of our routing architecture in IoT environments.

Related Papers

[1] Masanori Ishino, Yuki Koizumi, and Toru Hasegawa, “A Study on a Routing-based Mobility Management Architecture for IoT Devices,” in Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Network Protocols (ICNP 2014) Ph.D. Forum, Oct. 2014.

Biologically-inspired Networking

This is a joint research project with Advanced Network Architecture Laboratory, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University.

Adaptive Virtual Topology Control Based on Attractor Selection

The growth of the Internet and emerging application layer technologies cause numerous changes in network environments. Thus, it becomes important to achieve adaptive methods of controlling networks in addition to optimizing their performance. To achieve an adaptive network control method, we focus on attractor selection, which models behaviors where biological systems adapt to unknown changes in their surrounding environments and recover their conditions. In this research, we show the applicability of the attractor selection to the adaptive virtual topology control in IP over wavelength-routed WDM networks. The simulation results indicate that our virtual topology control method based on attractor selection quickly and adaptively responds to various changes in traffic demand and our method adapts to at most twice larger changes in traffic demand than existing heuristic approaches.

Related Papers

[1] Yuki Koizumi, Takashi Miyamura, Sin'ichi Arakawa, Eiji Oki, Kohei Shiomoto, and Masayuki Murata, “Adaptive virtual network topology control based on attractor selection,” IEEE/OSA Journal of Lightwave Technology, vol. 28, pp. 1720-1731, June 2010.

[2] Yuki Koizumi, Takashi Miyamura, Shin’ichi Arakawa, Eiji Oki, Kohei Shiomoto, and Masayuki Murata, “Robust virtual network topology control based on attractor selection,” in Proceedings of 13th Conference on Optical Network Design and Modeling (ONDM 2009), (Braunschweig, Germany), Feb. 2009.

[3] Yuki Koizumi, Takashi Miyamura, Shin’ichi Arakawa, Eiji Oki, Kohei Shiomoto, and Masayuki Murata, “Application of Attractor Selection to Adaptive Virtual Network Topology Control,” in Proceedings of 3rd International Conference on Bio-Inspired Models of Network, Information, and Computing Systems (BIONETICS 2008), (Hyogo, Japan), Nov. 2008.

Cooperation among Multiple Virtual Topologies Based on Attractor Superimposition

In this research, we propose a cooperation mechanism among multiple virtual topologies in wavelength-routed optical networks. It is based on attractor selection and superimposition, which models the biological systems that behave cooperatively and symbiotically only by sharing a small amount of information with each other. While our proposed method allows each virtual topology to be controlled in a distributed manner, it achieves the cooperation among those virtual topologies with sharing the activity, which indicates the condition of each virtual topology. Through simulations, we demonstrate that our proposed method coordinates all virtual topologies appropriately only by sharing the activity.

Related Papers

[1] Yuki Koizumi, Takashi Miyamura, Shin’ichi Arakawa, Kouhei Shiomoto, and Masayuki Murata, “Cooperation among Multiple Virtual Topologies Based on Attractor Superimposi- tion,” in Proceedings of 14th Conference on Optical Network Design and Modeling (ONDM 2010), February 2010.

Cloud Computing

Integration of Cloud Computing and Networking

Virtual machine live migration, which migrates a virtual machine between data centers, is studied as a way to improve quality of services hosted on clouds. Meanwhile, traffic engineering is performed in networks that connect geographically-dispersed data centers. These two controls are originally designed and operated individually. Though it is naturally expected that integrating virtual machine live migration and the traffic engineering could result in a good overall performance, the effectiveness of such an integrated control has not been well understood. In this paper, we therefore quantitatively investigate its effectiveness. We first formulate an integrated control and an individual control as mixed integer programming problems in which the objective function is minimization of the average link delay in the network.

Related Papers

[1] Yuji Manaka, Keita Hasegawa, Yuki Koizumi, and Toru Hasegawa, “On Live Migration and Routing Integration for Delay-sensitive Cloud Services in Wireless Mesh Networks,” in Proceedings of IEEE ICC, June 2015.

[2] Hirofumi Ichihara, Yuki Koizumi, Hiroyuki Ohsaki, Kunio Hato, Junichi Murayama, and Makoto Imase, "On the integrated control of virtual machine live migration and traffic engineering for cloud computing," in Proceedings of IEEE GLOBECOM, Dec. 2012.

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS


CONTACT


Information Sharing Platform Laboratory
Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University
A-building 5F A510, 1-5 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

TEL: +81-6-6879-4552
FAX: +81-6-6879-4554

Copyright © 2015 Yuki Koizumi. All Rights Reserved.